My Blog
By Mark P. Seraly MD PC and Associates
July 23, 2021
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Acne   Eczema   Psoriasis   Dry Skin   Bath Products  
Bath ProductsWhen you’re dealing with skin problems such as eczema or psoriasis, using the same skincare products that others do may end up being a major no-no. In fact, you need to pay close attention to the products you are currently using. Whether you’re noticing more flare-ups, or you are just concerned about how to care for your delicate skin, a dermatologist can be a helpful doctor to turn to. Here are some other tips that can help.

You Have Dry Skin

If you are dealing with very dry, itchy, and flaky skin then baths can actually make dry skin worse. This means that you’ll want to find products that prevent the body’s natural oils from being stripped away. Of course, while you may want to watch the temperature on that bathwater, this doesn’t mean that you can’t still enjoy a relaxing soak in the tub. Just look for soaps and bath products that contain coconut milk, which is incredibly hydrating. Not to mention, it will make your skin smell pretty great, too!

You Have Eczema

If you have eczema then bath time might be a real challenge; however, if you haven’t tried it yet you need to look for bath products that contain colloidal oatmeal. Instead of using a bubble bath or other products that could exacerbate eczema, use a colloidal oatmeal bath soak instead. This product is great for itchy, dry, and red skin caused by eczema. It can also be ideal for those with sunburns and poison ivy rashes.

You Have Acne-Prone Skin

Acne doesn’t just appear on the face, you may also notice embarrassing breakouts on your shoulders, back, legs, or other parts of the body, too. If you are prone to breakouts, it’s important to find a product that won’t make acne worse while also removing excess oil from the skin. One option is Epsom salts.

Not only are they great for reducing inflammation but they also help to exfoliate the skin to remove the buildup of dead skin cells, which in turn prevents clogged pores. Soaps with tea tree oil, sulfur, or charcoal may also be great for keeping pores clean and removing impurities in the skin.

You Have Psoriasis

When it comes to psoriasis, gentle bath products are key! Look for body wash rather than soap, which can actually alter the pH of the skin and lead to further dryness. Instead, look for a gentle, fragrance-free body wash. You’ll also want to ease off the hot water and instead opt for lukewarm water when bathing or showering. Just like with eczema, colloidal oatmeal can also be soothing for psoriasis plaques.

If in doubt, your dermatologist is a wellspring of information to help you find the ideal products for your skin. A dermatologist will also know what ingredients and products to avoid based on the skin problems you’re facing. Ask your dermatologist today!
By Mark P. Seraly MD PC and Associates
July 08, 2021
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Skin   Skin Care   Exercise  
ExerciseIt’s a no-brainer that exercise offers a wide range of health benefits. We know it’s great for the heart and lungs, and it helps you maintain healthy body weight; however, one thing you might not realize is that exercise might also improve the health and appearance of your skin. So, if you needed yet another reason to start exercising, healthier-looking skin could just be it!

It Reduces Stress

Exercise is a great stress reliever, and we also know that acne and other conditions can be exacerbated by stress. Since regular physical activity combats stress, it may also improve certain skin problems such as acne and eczema. After all, our stress hormones impact how much oil the skin’s sebaceous glands produce. You may just find that your brisk morning walk helps keep you calm and collected, while also maintaining healthier-looking skin.

It Gets the Blood Flowing

We all know that blood carries vital nutrients throughout the body, so getting the heart pumping and the circulatory system moving during your next workout session will also get blood pumping faster. This increased blood flow brought on by that HIIT workout or that boxing class also improves circulation even once you’re done working out. This increased circulation could actually help repair damaged cells while promoting the development of new ones. Increased blood flow also removes toxins from the cells.

The Concerns of Exercise on the Skin

Of course, one of the biggest concerns a dermatologist might have for the health of someone’s skin is if they workout outdoors. It’s important to protect your skin from sun exposure, especially during peak hours of 10 am-4 pm, when the sun’s rays are strongest.

If you do plan to go for a run or workout outside you must look for a pH-balanced, broad-spectrum sunscreen that has at least an SPF of 30. Make sure to apply it to the face and body about 30 minutes before going outside. Since sweating can make sunscreen less effective, it’s also best to wear clothes that cover and protect your skin from the sun’s rays.

If you are dealing with skin problems such as acne, psoriasis, or rosacea and you’re looking for ways to keep these skin conditions managed while still being able to exercise, a dermatologist is one of the best specialists to turn to for answers, recommendations, and treatment options that fit your needs.
By Mark P. Seraly MD PC and Associates
June 18, 2021
Category: Skin Condition
Seborrheic DermatitisAre you dealing with a red, itchy, and flaky scalp? It could just be dandruff, or you could be dealing with a skin condition known as seborrheic dermatitis (sometimes referred to as seborrheic eczema). While this condition most often affects the scalp, some people may also develop symptoms on the face or body (typically in areas where there are more sebaceous glands such as the nose or back). How do you know that you’re dealing with seborrheic dermatitis?
 
Symptoms of Seborrheic Dermatitis

In infants, this skin condition is known as cradle cap and it results in greasy, scaly patches of skin on the head. Puberty often brings with it oilier skin, and this is often when we see teens and adults complaining of redness, swelling, or scaling on the scalp, eyebrows, nose, armpits, groin, or upper back.
 
Causes of Seborrheic Dermatitis

While dermatologists see this condition in a wide range of patients ranging from newborns to seniors, this condition most often occurs between 30-60 years old. While the root cause still hasn’t been determined, there are certain beliefs as to what might cause seborrheic dermatitis, including a reaction to a type of yeast that’s normally found on our skin. Certain chronic conditions such as rosacea, psoriasis, HIV, or epilepsy may also increase your risk for developing seborrheic dermatitis.
 
If you have been diagnosed with seborrheic dermatitis by a dermatologist, it’s important to figure out what might trigger symptoms. As with many skin conditions, seborrheic dermatitis may flare up and then go away for weeks or even months at a time. Some triggers include,
  • Hormone fluctuations and imbalances
  • Weather changes (e.g. cold or dry weather)
  • Certain prescription medications
  • Detergents, soaps, and cleaning products
  • Stress
Managing Seborrheic Dermatitis

In most cases, your dermatologist can prescribe specialized skin products that can help to keep skin moisturized while preventing scaly patches from forming. Cleansers, shampoos, and other products that contain zinc pyrithione are often most effective for treating seborrheic dermatitis symptoms. Some products can be purchased over-the-counter, but for those with more severe symptoms, you may require a prescription from your dermatologist.

Lifestyle modifications such as getting more sleep, eating a healthy diet, and reducing stress can also reduce the number of flare-ups you experience. A dermatologist can help map out a treatment plan for you to better manage your symptoms.
 
While seborrheic dermatitis may go away without treatment and isn’t usually a cause for concern, you may want to consult your dermatologist if the symptoms are severe, they impact your appearance, or they affect your everyday routine.
By Mark P. Seraly MD PC and Associates
June 09, 2021
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Alopecia  
AlopeciaIt can be incredibly distressing when you start to lose your hair unexpectedly. Alopecia is something that affects both men and women and this autoimmune disorder causes patches of hair to fall out. This condition is most often found in women under 30.
 
Alopecia Can Be Hereditary

If you develop alopecia you may want to point a finger at your genetics. In fact, both parents have the ability to pass down alopecia to their children. So, if you have a family member with alopecia areata then you may be more likely to develop this condition at some point during your lifetime. Of course, genetics isn’t the only factor that plays a role in whether or not you develop alopecia. There are other deciding factors, as well.
 
Alopecia Targets the Hair Follicles

As we mentioned above, alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder, which means that the body attacks the hair follicles, causing them to slow or even halt hair growth. There are different kinds of alopecia and people experience different symptom severities. Some people may notice hair regrowth in a few months while others may not. Again, you must have a dermatologist that you can turn to for answers.
 
There are Solutions for Managing Alopecia

While there is no cure, there are treatment options out there that can help stimulate hair growth and reduce the immune system response. The type and severity of your alopecia, along with your age and the severity of your hair loss will play major roles in what types of treatment options are best for you. This is something that a skincare professional can discuss with you during your consultation.
 
For those with milder symptoms, there are injectable and topical medications that could help. Common treatments include,
  • Topical or injectable corticosteroids
  • Minoxidil solution (applied to the scalp to regrow hair)
  • Anthralin cream
Those with more severe symptoms may respond better to these treatment options,
  • Oral steroids
  • Immunomodulatory medications
  • Topical immunotherapy
If you are dealing with sudden hair loss, it’s important to talk with a dermatologist to find out what’s going on, so you know the best way to treat it. Alopecia can be distressing, but your dermatologist can provide you with options to improve hair regrowth and to once again boost your confidence in your appearance.
By Mark P. Seraly MD PC and Associates
May 24, 2021
Category: Skin Care
Skin Cancer ScreeningWhen was the last time you saw a dermatologist? We’re pretty sure most people don’t know or perhaps have never stepped foot inside a dermatologist’s office; however, 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer by the age of 70, and more than two people die every hour in the US from skin cancer. This is why everyone needs to visit their dermatologist for regular skin exams and skin cancer screenings.

What should I expect from a skin cancer screening?

There is nothing uncomfortable, painful, or invasive about a skin cancer screening. This can be a relief to know and may even make someone more likely to come in for the screening they need. A skin cancer screening involves a simple, non-invasive visual examination that is performed by a qualified dermatologist. Your skin doctor will examine all growths, moles, and birthmarks to check for any changes in shape, color, size, or texture that could be warning signs of cancer.

Just as with any health screening, a skin cancer screening can help your dermatologist detect skin cancer during the very early stages when it’s highly treatable. If your dermatologist does detect a suspicious growth, they may recommend a biopsy. A biopsy simply means that your dermatologist will remove a small amount of tissue from the area to test for cancer cells.

Who should get a skin cancer screening?

Everyone can benefit from a skin cancer screening; however, certain risk factors can increase your odds of developing skin cancer over your lifetime. It’s important to know your risk level so you can talk with your dermatologist about how often you should come in for screenings. Those at increased risk may need to come in more than once a year. These risk factors include,
  • Being fair-skinned
  • Having blonde or red hair
  • Light eyes
  • Skin that burns or freckles easily
  • A history of sunburns
  • Family history of skin cancer
  • Extensive sun exposure (e.g. working outdoors)
If it’s been more than a year since your last skin cancer screening you must schedule your exam with a dermatologist as soon as possible. While wearing sunscreen and protecting your skin from the sun can certainly help, it’s still necessary to see a dermatologist at least once a year.




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