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Posts for tag: Dermatologist

By Mark P. Seraly MD PC and Associates
February 19, 2021
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Dermatologist   Mole  
When To See a Dermatologist for a Mole
Worried that all those years of sunbathing have caught up with you? Do you have a family history of skin cancer? If so, these might be reasons to turn to a dermatologist every year for skin cancer screenings. These dermatology screenings can help us catch cancerous lesions early on when they are highly treatable. Of course, you should also be performing your own monthly examinations, checking your skin from head to scalp, to look for skin cancer. Here’s what you should be on the lookout for,

Remember Your ABCDEs

This easy-to-remember acronym will help you spot those signs of skin cancer whenever you examine moles yourself. This is what it stands for,
  • A is for asymmetry: A healthy mole will be perfectly circular and symmetrical. If you find that half of the mole is shaped differently from the other half, this could be a sign of pre-cancerous growth.
  • B is for a border: A healthy mole will have a clearly defined border. If the mole has a jagged or an even or poorly defined border, it’s time to visit your dermatologist.
  • C is for color: A healthy mole will remain a singular color throughout your life. If the mole changes color or develops multiple colors this could be a sign of skin cancer.
  • D is for diameter: A healthy mole is typically smaller than a pencil eraser (under 5mm). Moles over 5mm, or larger than a pencil eraser, may be cause for concern. Large moles warrant seeing a dermatologist.
  • E is for evolving: A healthy mole will remain the same over the course of your lifetime. So, if you notice it changing at all then it’s worth having a dermatologist look at it.
Lookout for These Moles, Too

Along with remembering your ABCDEs, it’s also a good idea to look for,
  • New moles: Just because you develop a new mole doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s cancerous; however, if you start noticing any new moles developing past the age of 20 (particularly on the face, neck, shoulder, or other sun-exposed areas), this warrants an evaluation with a skincare professional.
  • Troublesome moles: Do you have a mole that bleeds, itches, crusts over, or is painful or tender? If so, the mole should be checked out.
If you have a growth that has you concerned, a skin doctor can easily examine and biopsy the growth to determine if it’s cancerous. If it is, we offer a variety of treatment options that can remove the cancerous growth and help you get back to living your life.
By Mark P. Seraly MD PC and Associates
January 15, 2018
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Dermatologist  

Chicken PoxWhen your child breaks out all over in a blistery, itchy red rash, there’s a good chance it’s the chicken pox. Chicken pox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus, and although it’s typically a childhood disease, people who have not contracted it as a child can suffer from it in adulthood as well.

Chicken pox is highly contagious and can spread from person to person by direct contact or through the air from an infected person's coughing or sneezing. 

Symptoms of Chicken pox

Itchy red spots or blisters all over the body are telltale signs of chicken pox. It may also be accompanied by a headache, sore throat and fever. Symptoms are generally mild among children, but can cause serious complications in infants, adults and people with weakened immune systems.

The most common symptoms of chicken pox include:

  • Itchy rash all over the body, including the face, on the arms and legs and inside the mouth
  • Fatigue and irritability
  • Fever
  • Feeling of general illness
  • Reduced appetite

The symptoms of chicken pox may resemble other skin problems or medical conditions, so it is always important to consult your child's physician or dermatologist for proper diagnosis. If the chicken pox rash seems generalized or severe, or if the child has a high grade fever or is experiencing a headache or nausea, seek medical care right away.

The incubation period (from exposure to first appearance of symptoms) is 14 to 16 days. When the blisters crust over, they are no longer contagious and the child can return to normal activity. 

Relief for Chicken Pox

It is important not to scratch the blisters as it can slow down the healing process and result in scarring. Scratching may also increase the risk of a bacterial infection. To help relieve the itching, soak in a cool or lukewarm oatmeal bath. A physician may recommend anti-itch ointments or medications, such as over-the-counter antihistamines, to control this troublesome itch.

Although about four million children get chicken pox each year, it may be preventable via a vaccine. Usually one episode of  chicken pox in childhood provides lifelong immunity to the virus.

Fortunately, chicken pox is more of a nuisance than a concern. With time and extra rest, the rash will pass and the child will be good as new! Contact your dermatologist whenever you have questions or concerns about chicken pox.

By Mark P. Seraly MD PC and Associates
November 30, 2016
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Dermatologist  

Welcome to Our Blog!

Your skin is the largest organ on your body, and we want to make sure you keep it as healthy as possible for the rest of your life. That’s why we’ve started this dermatology blog on our website, to keep you up to date on the latest advances in skin care.

Any abnormality on your skin can be a surprising and even frightening prospect. Feel free to browse our blog for posts on a number of topics to help you decide when it’s time to visit the dermatologist.

Check back regularly for updates! If you’d like to subscribe to our blog, just use the ‘Subscribe to Our RSS Feed’ link at the top of the blog page with your favorite RSS reader. And, as always, feel free to contact our office with any questions or concerns.